The History of Camelot Castle Bed and breakfast
The History of Camelot Castle Bed and breakfast
The History of Camelot Castle Bed and breakfast
The History of Camelot Castle Bed and breakfast

The History of Camelot Castle Hotel

Down through the ages fact and fiction have mingled, creating the tales of King Arthur's court, which we know and love today.

We are all familiar withromantic tales of chivalrous knights, magic and mystery, love and intrigue. These legends are inextricably linked with the enigmatic ruins of Tintagel Castle, perched precariously on a rugged, remote promontory of land, which can be reached only by a steep climb from the cove below or by a narrow pathway from the mainland.

Archaeological studies have revealed that the old settlement pre-dates the days of the Round Table by far, being established in the 3rd or 4th century AD.

By the 6th century, a great ditch had been dug, creating a formidable fortress within, known as Din Tagel. Early theories that the site was a monastery at this time have been largely discounted for the artefacts which have been found reveal that this was a place of great importance; high quality Mediterranean wares which could only be afforded by the privileged, courtly few.

Following a long period during which the site is thought to have been deserted, Earl Richard of Cornwall & Poitou who built the castle whose ruins we see today, acquired Tintagel in the 12th century. It was already a place of legend and there is speculation that it was modelled to evoke romanticised tales of days gone by rather than to be a practical building.

Being so remote, it was little used and was already all but abandoned and falling into disrepair little more than a hundred years later. Since then sheep and wild birds have been its main occupants. As early as the 1850's the castle has been promoted as a tourist destination; generations gazing in wonder as they strolled through the arch, around the chapel and medieval garden, peered down the well and speculated whether the tunnel was used for food storage or had a different, long forgotten use.